Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Former WVU basketball players chip in to help southern West Virginia flood victims

Former WVU basketball guard Juwan Staten helped collect items for West Virginia residents affected by the flood on Wednesday, June 29, 2016.  (Photo Credit John Flowers @Jflow41)

Former WVU basketball guard Juwan Staten helped collect items for West Virginia residents affected by the flood on Wednesday, June 29, 2016.
(Photo Credit John Flowers @Jflow41)

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.–Last week’s floods in southern West Virginia have caused an outpouring of support from many across the country. Celebrities like Brad Paisley, Jennifer Garner and Ben Affleck have all reached out during the Mountain State’s time of need. But a group of former West Virginia basketball players decided they wanted to help out the state that adopted them as one of its own.

“Everyone thought the people down there were in a horrible situation, very, very unfortunate and me and the guys got together and started talking,” former Mountaineers guard John Flowers said. “We basically just came up with what we did, which was set up stations for donations and started receiving.”

“We felt it was only right to contribute to the cause,” WVU standout Kevin Jones added.

Flowers, Jones, Da’Sean Butler, Joe Mazzulla and Juwan Staten all talked and came up with the idea of how to best help the state that supported them during their college careers and after.

The former Mountaineers and others held signs at the corner of Patteson Drive and University Avenue in Morgantown on Wednesday urging passerby and motorists to help the cause.

Former WVU basketball players Joe Mazulla, John Flowers and Kevin Jones collected items for WV flood relief victims on Wednesday.  (Photo Credit: John Flowers)

Former WVU basketball players Joe Mazzulla, John Flowers and Kevin Jones collected items for WV flood relief victims on Wednesday.
(Photo Credit: John Flowers)

“We raised a lot of money,” Flowers said. “We got a lot of donations, a lot of water, pop, a lot of cleaning supplies and stuff like that. We got bleach. We raised over $2,000. I think we did okay, we did the best we could do.”

For these five young men, it wasn’t about them but aiding the people in this state who have worked so hard for what they have.

“The people in this state they work hard,” Flowers said. “They are blue collar people.”

Flowers’ time at WVU was special and like many others, it meant a lot to be a Mountaineer.

“It means a lot to be a Mountaineer,” he said. “I fell in love with the state when I went to school here. I am still here. I live in Morgantown now so I am a member of this state.”

 

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