Monday, July 24, 2017

WVU’s Carter emerging as premier point guard

Jevon Carter (2) takes a breather during WVU's 81-77 victory over Texas A&M on Saturday, January 28, 2017. (Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

Jevon Carter (2) takes a breather during WVU’s 81-77 victory over Texas A&M on Saturday, January 28, 2017.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

MORGANTOWN, W.Va.–There is no question what Jevon Carter means to the West Virginia University basketball team.

The 6-foot-2, 200-pounder is the front and center leader. He is a decisive constituent of the Mountaineers’ defense.

Carter averages 11.8 points, 4.4 rebounds, 4.6 assists and 3.0 steals a contest.

Despite what Carter means to WVU, head coach Bob Huggins feels that he is often overlooked on just how endowed he is by the rest of the nation.

“According to our Big 12 television analyst, it doesn’t,” he said. “I haven’t seen his picture up there with that group yet. They’ve had Baylor’s point guard, which is very good. For what he does for us, he’s as good as anybody.”

Now in his second season at the reigns, Carter is emerging as one of the conference’s premier points.

It wasn’t an easy progression but the Maywood, Illinois native is embracing his role and has dedicated himself to it.

And he is starting to feel at ease heading the offense.

“More than I did last year,” he said.

Jevon Carter (2) chases down Texas A&M's Admon Gilder (3) during the Mountaineers 81-77 win on Saturday, January 28, 2017. (Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

Jevon Carter (2) chases down Texas A&M’s Admon Gilder (3) during the Mountaineers 81-77 win on Saturday, January 28, 2017.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

As a freshman, Carter was thrown into the fire when the Mountaineers lost their top two point guards at the end of the season but he accepted the challenge.

“When we really started playing him there was when Wanny (Juwan Staten) and Gary (Browne Jr.) got hurt,” Huggins said. “He was trying to feel his way through and then he played all last year at point guard really. He just gets better and better and better. He wants to be good. I think that’s the most important thing. He studies film. He wants to be good. He wants to understand the position, which makes it a lot easier.”

Hard work has definitely paid off for the junior guard. Huggins constantly praises him for being in the gym and getting work in.

James Long (13), Jevon Carter (2) and Daxter Miles Jr. (4) celebrate WVU's win over Kansas on Tuesday, January 24, 2017. (Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

James Long (13), Jevon Carter (2) and Daxter Miles Jr. (4) celebrate WVU’s win over Kansas on Tuesday, January 24, 2017.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS)

While Carter puts in the effort, he believes that without his teammates he wouldn’t be the athlete he is today.

“It’s not just me, it’s a team thing,” he said. “I couldn’t do what I do without my teammates.”

Through the ups and downs of the last two seasons, Carter has gained the knowledge he needs to be fruitful at this level.

“I feel like I have experience in everything,” he said. “We’ve been up a lot, down a lot in games so I feel like it’s nothing I haven’t seen.”

As Carter continues to mature, the Mountaineers’ chance for success rises.

 

Cover Photo Credit: Kelsie LeRose, BGS

 

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