Monday, March 27, 2017

WVU’s Jevon Carter turning it on at the right time

WVU guard Jevon Carter (2) claps for teammates after a play against TCU in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016. (Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

WVU guard Jevon Carter (2) claps for teammates after a play against TCU in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

KANSAS CITY, Mo.– West Virginia University’s Jevon Carter scored 15 points in the Mountaineers 86-66 victory over TCU in the quarterfinals of the Phillips 66 Big 12 Championship on Thursday night. He was 5-of-8 from the field and 3-of-5 from beyond the arc.

After struggling throughout the year, Carter has been coming on over WVU’s last four games, which is huge for the Mountaineers as they shoot for winning a National Championship.

The sophomore guard has picked up his play during over the past two weeks. He is averaging 9.8 points and 4.3 assists per game during the four game span.

“It’s big for us,” freshman forward Esa Ahmad said. “He’s our point guard. We look to him to run the team. It’s big.”

“It’s a great thing,” junior guard Tarik Phillip said. “When he hits shots, it makes us more deadly as a team, more shooters on the court. He’s playing with more confidence I feel like to be honest with you.”

Carter’s struggles this year are likely due to having to adjust to learning to run the team.

WVU guard Jevon Carter (2) shoots a 3-pointer against TCU in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016. (Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

WVU guard Jevon Carter (2) shoots a 3-pointer against TCU in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

Last season the Maywood, Illinois native’s production dropped when seniors Juwan Staten and Gary Browne got injured.

The same goes for this season.

The 6-foot-2, 185-pound guard isn’t having a bad season. He is averaging 9.3 points and 3.3 assists per game.

Carter’s defense is still top notch. He is second in the Big 12 with 58 steals, just nine short of last season’s total.

But Carter sticks to it and works hard every day, and his teammates think that is why it’s all coming together now.

“He’s just been working hard in practice,” Ahmad said. “He’s been getting up a lot of shots before and after practice so we expect that.”

Carter, himself knows that hard work and confidence will pay off in the end.

WVU's Jevon Carter (2) tries to get past TCU's Chauncey Collins in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016. (Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

WVU’s Jevon Carter (2) tries to get past TCU’s Chauncey Collins in the quarterfinals of the Big 12 tournament on Thursday, March 10, 2016.
(Photo Credit: Kelsie VanderWijst, BGS)

“Well, you know, shooters, they keep shooting,” he said. “I’ve got to give a lot of credit to my guy here to my left, you know, putting a lot of time in in the gym, making sure my shot is correct. And just staying confident, shooting is about staying confident. The more confident you are, the more shots you’re going to make.”

If the Mountaineers have both their point guards heating it up on the court, it will benefit the team during their post season run.

“It means a lot because if he can play better and we got to we can play better,” senior forward Jonathon Holton said. “Those (Carter and Phillip) are our point guards. And if our point guards can play, the point guard is supposed to be the leader and they got to call the plays and all that kind of stuff. So if they do their thing, it makes it easier for us.”

WVU brings the pressure of defense and the Mountaineers are shooting well, they are a force to reckon with.

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